Beauty In Brokenness

Producing Artistic Director, Jonathan Harris, shares some thoughts on finding beauty in brokenness and conveying such beauty through the art of story telling:

“Is there something beautiful to be found in that which is broken, damaged, shattered, or in disrepair? Is there something desirable in the unwanted, something redeemable in the seemingly useless? Can something magnificent come out of things or events that are heart breaking, painful, and tragic? Can anything good come out of suffering and pain? Henri Nouwen in his book, “Life of The Beloved” shares some thoughts on the subject:

As I write you now about our brokenness, I recall a scene from Leonard Bernstein’s Mass (a musical work written in memory of John F. Kennedy) that embodied for me the thought of brokenness put under the blessing. Toward the end of this work, the priest, richly dressed in splendid liturgical vestments, is lifted up by his people. He towers high above the adoring crowd, carrying in his hands a glass chalice. Suddenly, the human pyramid collapses, and the priest comes tumbling down. His vestments are ripped off, and his glass chalice falls to the ground and is shattered. As he walks slowly through the debris of his former glory—barefoot, wearing only blue jeans and a T-shirt—children’s voices are heard singing, “Laude, laude, laude”—“Praise, praise, praise.” Suddenly the priest notices the broken chalice. He looks at it for a long time and then, haltingly, he says, “I never realised that broken glass could shine so brightly.”

Perhaps brokenness points to deeper meaning in life, to a need for something beyond ourselves, to a transcendent experience, or to an inexpressible joy. Perhaps brokenness provides a special quality to something or someone, a unique perspective, an intriguing angle, a distinguished imagination, or a lovable characteristic. Perhaps the wounds we all have credit us with a special strength we would otherwise not possess, a strength that may be of benefit to someone else, or for something else we are unaware. In the words of American playwright Thornton Wilder in his short play “The Angel that Troubled the Waters“, “Without your wound where would your power be?” 

So much can be expressed through imagination and creative story telling. It is such a privilege and challenge to share and experience stories through theatre and real life that reveal this often hidden beauty in a wound. We usually have to look really hard to find it, but through stories, it becomes more apparent. These stories have the potential to bestow upon us an otherwise inaccessible and intangible gift, which ultimately allows us to touch and change the lives of others through the power of our very own wound or brokenness.

In the Japanese art form, Kintsukuroi, broken pottery is fixed with a lacquer resin sprinkled with powdered gold, thus increasing the overall value of the creation. I wonder if such a simple and fascinating technique can reveal to us something magical about the human life, human condition, or human spirit as well.”

~Jonathan Harris (Producing Artistic Director)

This blog was originally posted in April, 2013